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Images via Ten Speed Press

Afraid of vegetables? (YES. Yes, I am.) Don’t know what to do beyond sautee-with-garlic? (YES THAT’S ME.) Yotam Ottolenghi is here to help! Check out his interview on Weekend Edition Sunday — and then try this seriously amazing-looking recipe for peas with sorrel and mustard. And then tell me where the heck to buy sorrel [try using another dark, bitter green, dandilions or arugula?].

Recipe: Peas With Sorrel And Mustard

(Serves four as a side dish.)

10 1/2 ounces/300 grams fresh or defrosted frozen green peas
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
3/4 teaspoon superfine sugar
2 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups/220 grams green onions, white and green parts, trimmed and sliced on the diagonal into 3/8-inch-/1-centimeter-thick slices
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon black mustard seeds, toasted
6 tablespoons/75 grams Greek yogurt
3 1/2 ounces/100 grams sorrel leaves and stems, coarsely shredded
Salt

Bring a pan of water to a boil, add the peas, and blanch for just 30 seconds. Drain into a colander, refresh under cold water, and set aside.

Place both mustards in a small bowl with the sugar, 3 tablespoons water, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Mix together to form a smooth paste and set aside.

Place a large saute pan over medium-high heat and add the oil. Once hot, add the green onions and garlic and fry for 8 minutes, stirring frequently, until golden brown. Turn down the heat to low and add the mustard sauce, peas, 2 teaspoons of the mustard seeds, and the yogurt. Stir for 1 minute until everything is well mixed and the yogurt is warmed through. Remove from the heat, stir in the sorrel, and serve at once, with the remaining 1 teaspoon mustard seeds sprinkled on top.

(via npr)

The water towers in New York are always so interesting!

A visual taxonomy of the many permutations of New York City’s water tower – one of the city’s 101 most iconic objects.

(thanks/via: explore-blog)

The water towers in New York are always so interesting!

A visual taxonomy of the many permutations of New York City’s water tower – one of the city’s 101 most iconic objects.

(thanks/via: explore-blog)

Inside the Life of a Beekeeper with @girlnextdoorhoney

To see more photos and videos of Hilary’s daily encounters with bees, follow @girlnextdoorhoney on Instagram.

“Everything about bees is surprising and fascinating,” says beekeeper Hilary Kearney (@girlnextdoorhoney). Hilary started her own beekeeping business in her hometown of San Diego, California, after reading about it in a book. “Unlike traditional beekeepers,” she explains, “most of my hives are in urban and suburban settings, as I believe in integrating bees back into our daily lives.” Now an owner of around 40 beehives, Hilary also services bee removals, holds educational classes and runs a “host a hive program” that places beehives in volunteers’ backyards.

As a beekeeper, Hilary strives to educate people about the friendly nature of honeybees and how much they contribute to our lives. With a background in visual arts, she uses Instagram as a channel to artistically communicate information about bees and their behaviors. In one of her photos, she documents what’s known as festooning, where bees hold onto each other to create a scaffold while they build honeycombs. “It’s one of my favorite things that bees do,” she says. “My visual inspiration mostly comes from the bees themselves, but my urge to share and teach is what motivates me.”

(thanks/via: instagram)

In 1802, pharmacist and amateur meteorologist Luke Howard drew up the first classification system for clouds, providing the origin of the Latin naming system we still use today. Meteorologists later developed a  system of cloud symbol line drawings in order to standardize weather maps.

Those symbols, the legends for which I’ve included above (for low, medium, and high clouds), strike me as a beautifully simple and artistic way to translate such a varied and unique phenomenon as clouds. They’re half zodiac, half typography. I just love them.

Can’t get enough of our fluffy sky friends? The great Every Cloud print also included above comes from artist and designer Joseph Perry, whose work I’ve featured before. If you’d like one for your own wall, Perry’s print available in a limited edition run of 100. Find it here.

(thanks/via: jtotheizzoe)


Norway’s beautiful new bank notes are an instant design classic.  (Read more about these back notes at  Fast Co Design here)

(thanks/via: guardian)

Norway’s beautiful new bank notes are an instant design classic.  (Read more about these back notes at  Fast Co Design here)

(thanks/via: guardian)

Ya gotta love that view of Stockholm in the video too.

More about the world’s first electric wakeboard at MyModernMet

HOW TO LISTEN TO A PODCAST with Ira Glass and Mary

Because podcasts can change your world. Really. 

(thanks/via: nprfreshair)