mobylosangelesarchitecture:

there are so many l.a’s. which might sound like nonsense, as it’s also true of other cities. there are so many new yorks, and so many londons, and etc. but l.a is one of the most schizophrenic cities on the planet.

if you look in one direction it’s modern and urban.
another direction it’s old and urban.
another direction it’s a developing world city.
another direction it’s a bucolic affluent suburb.
another direction it’s the desert. and etc.

this building, the el royale, represents early 20th century hollywood royalty. when l.a and hollywood were birthing themselves daily, and trying to shape themselves into regal and quasi-european metropolises. or metropolii?

even then the battles raged (ok, maybe they didn’t rage). should l.a be modern? should it be traditional? so you have frank lloyd wright and richard neutra and schindler trying to make l.a into a modernist paradise. and then you have buildings like the el royale, which was the product of angelenos trying to make l.a into bavaria by the sea.

and now everything co-exists, at times peacefully, at times discordantly. and since the early 20th century the fray has been populated by even more l.a’s. the l.a of strip malls. the l.a of beige tract housing. the l.a of frank gehry. the l.a of everything.

so here’s the el royale. an apartment house palace swimming in a sea of palm trees and cactii.

i mean, you move to l.a in the early 20th century, you’re 10,000 miles from europe in the middle of the desert, so why not build a bavarian castle apartment house and surround it with palm trees?

moby

Mesmerizing Interiors Of Iran’s Mosques Captured In Rare Photographs By Mohammad Domiri

Mohammad Domiri, a talented architectural photographer from northern Iran, takes stunning photos of grandiose mosque architecture throughout the Middle East.

Middle Eastern architecture is often recognized by its elegantly curved arches and spiraling columns, which feature heavily throughout Domiri’s photos. Many of the historic sites Domiri shoots are decorated with colorful stained-glass windows, geometric decorations and painstakingly detailed mosaics, so he shoots with special wide-angle lenses to make sure that he captures all of these details. Because they are historic structures, many of these mosques also impose heavy restrictions on photography – making photos like Domiri’s very rare.

(thanks/via: proofmathisbeautiful)

Le Corbusier

Rare images of Corbu in color on display at Maison La Roche in Paris until December 15th. Originally shot for the 1954 magazine Paris Match.

(thanks/via:  and ArchDaily)

Reasons to visit London: the new Making Colour exhibition at the National Gallery and the Softroom designed dining space in the Great Court at the British Museum.  A shop to explore in Marylebone to explore.

(thanks/via: Deezen and the National Gallery and British Museum)

An animated history of modern architecture from Matteo Muci, a product and graphic designer from Italy.

(thanks/via: FastCo Design)

A pretty interesting inversion of the maze concept from the ever inventive Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group.  It is currently on exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC (timelapse construction).  (more about the group here and Ingels’ TEDTalk hints at BIG’s inventiveness.)
(thanks/via: NationalBuildingMuseum)

A pretty interesting inversion of the maze concept from the ever inventive Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group.  It is currently on exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC (timelapse construction).  (more about the group here and Ingels’ TEDTalk hints at BIG’s inventiveness.)

(thanks/via: NationalBuildingMuseum)

Click the link because this project looks amazing!  

Stefano Boeri’s “vertical forest” nears completion in Milan

(thanks/via: dezeen)

Click the link because this project looks amazing!  

Stefano Boeri’s “vertical forest” nears completion in Milan

(thanks/via: dezeen)

Germany’s Real-Life Grand Budapest Hotel

It turns out the fictitious European town in which Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotelwas set isn’t so fictitious after all.

Hidden amidst the Brandenburg forest 15 kilometers (9.32 miles) north of Berlin are buildings seemingly lost in time and built in such grandiose socialist-classicism style, you wouldn’t be surprised if a concierge named Gustave greeted you at the door or a “Boy With Apple” painting adorned the walls. Winding back the clock a few decades to the Cold War era, it was within these very four walls that the German Democratic Republic (GDR) brainwashed young people and officials from all around the world with propaganda about the ideals of socialism and the evils of the capitalist West.

From 1951 to 1990, the FDJ (Freie Deutsche Jugend) youth academy was the top-secret educational facility for the official communist youth movement of the Socialist Unity Party of Germany, occupying a vast 43 000 square meters at Bogensee near Wandlitz. Today, despite being relinquished and left to decay for over two decades, these buildings haven’t lost their majestic, otherworldly charms.


For the full history of the estate and complete photo gallery, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…

(thanks/via: atlasobscura)

Shigeru Ban wins Pritzker Prize 2014 from the always fantastic Dezeen.
Photo: Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch via Dezeen
Who knew the joys of carboard tubing?!
(thanks/via: Dezeen)

Shigeru Ban wins Pritzker Prize 2014 from the always fantastic Dezeen.

Photo: Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch via Dezeen

Who knew the joys of carboard tubing?!

(thanks/via: Dezeen)

Humanharp (by humanharp)

Using the Brooklyn Bridge to play music.

(thanks/via: Dezeen)

Puzzle Facade (by Javier Lloret)

Who doesn’t love LED, Rubrix cubes, color?  Brilliant.  Read the article about this project on Core77 here.

(thanks/via: Core77)