Cool stuff from smartereveryday!!!!

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.
As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  
What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.
I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

(thanks/via: smartereveryday)

Cool stuff from smartereveryday!!!!

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.

As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  

What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.

I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

(thanks/via: smartereveryday)

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

Space Facts - Interesting Facts about Outer Space

(thanks/via: Chris Jones’ really amazing Space Facts website)

Trailer for The Theory of Everything, the spectacular new film about Stephen Hawking and his wife, Jane. Complement with Hawking’s actual theory of everything, animated in 150 [!!!!] seconds. Also see Errol Morris’s excellent documentary about the iconic physicist. 

EXCELLENT!!

(thanks!!/via: explore-blog)

This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.
(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.

(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

Watch this trailer for Alive Inside.  More about the documentary here and the FastCo Create post iPod Connected Seniors Recharge Their Memories

Don’t forget those grapefruit headphone with new music when it’s time okay?

(thanks/via: FastCoCreate)


In 1983, excavations for a new terminal at the Charleston International Airport in Charleston, South Carolina, began with a bang, as metal hit bone. The construction workers had stumbled upon a fossil so big that it required a backhoe to unearth. Now, over thirty years later, the remains have been identified as that of the largest known bird ever to have flown our skies.
The creature lived 25 to 28 million years ago and had a wingspan of 20 to 24 feet—twice that of the largest volant (i.e., flying) bird alive today, the wandering albatross.
Like the albatross, this ancient enormous bird soared long-range over the ocean, but how it managed to do so with a mass and wingspan that seemingly defies aerodynamic theory had, until recently, been a mystery. “Anyone with a beating heart would have been struck with awe,” says paleontologist Dr. Daniel Ksepka, whose study of the bird’s flight performance was published July 7, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"This bird would have just blotted out the sun as it swooped overhead. Up close, it may have called to mind a dragon."
Discovery of the Biggest Bird That Ever Flew Rewrites Our Planet’s Histories and Mysteries

(thanks/via: newsweek)

In 1983, excavations for a new terminal at the Charleston International Airport in Charleston, South Carolina, began with a bang, as metal hit bone. The construction workers had stumbled upon a fossil so big that it required a backhoe to unearth. Now, over thirty years later, the remains have been identified as that of the largest known bird ever to have flown our skies.

The creature lived 25 to 28 million years ago and had a wingspan of 20 to 24 feet—twice that of the largest volant (i.e., flying) bird alive today, the wandering albatross.

Like the albatross, this ancient enormous bird soared long-range over the ocean, but how it managed to do so with a mass and wingspan that seemingly defies aerodynamic theory had, until recently, been a mystery. “Anyone with a beating heart would have been struck with awe,” says paleontologist Dr. Daniel Ksepka, whose study of the bird’s flight performance was published July 7, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This bird would have just blotted out the sun as it swooped overhead. Up close, it may have called to mind a dragon."

Discovery of the Biggest Bird That Ever Flew Rewrites Our Planet’s Histories and Mysteries

(thanks/via: newsweek)

This very rare all-white humpback seriously looks like a ghost. Watch this hauntingly beautiful animal here. 

AWEsome!!!!!!!!

(thanks/via: huffingtonpost)



This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings
… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here. 
And watch our video!:


(thanks/via: NPR, jtotheizzoe, skunkbear

This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings

… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here

And watch our video!:

(thanks/via: NPRjtotheizzoeskunkbear

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).

These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).

Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.

(thanks/via: skunkbear and ted)

(via npr)

This is so cool and useful.

Ultra-cool. Ultra-Ever Dry is a superhydrophobic (water) and oleophobic (hydrocarbons) coating that will completely repel almost any liquid.

A droplet resting on a solid surface and surrounded by a gas forms a characteristic contact angle θ. If the solid surface is rough, and the liquid is in intimate contact with the solid asperities, the droplet is in the Wenzel state. If the liquid rests on the tops of the asperities, it is in the Cassie-Baxter state.

(thanks/via: scienceisbeauty)