Video footage at the very edge of molten magma in a pretty cool, pretty hot, pretty dramatic, and maybe pretty risky video but thanks for sharing, right??!!

Geoff Mackley, Bradley Ambrose, Nathan Berg, after an epic struggle with the weather for 35 days, … became the first people ever to get this close to Marum Volcano’s famed lava lake on Ambrym Island, Vanuatu. Coming within 30 metres of the lava lake down a watercourse, it was possible to stand the heat for only 6 seconds. With Fire Brigade breathing apparatus and heat proof proximity suit it was possible to stand on the very edge and view the incredible show for over 40 minutes.

momofuku is breaking out in hives. well, not really. but in late july, momofuku took a trip to visit the fledgling apiary at the gowanus canal conservancy. located on the bank of the gowanus canal, these beehives are part of the gcc’s efforts to foster ecological growth in the area and are tended by borough bees member (+ momofuku staffer), kimberly rubin. our team took part in a hive inspection, learning what role honeybees play in our urban food system and just how delicious local honey tastes. 

to learn more about bees and their role in urban areas, take part in a tour of the gowanus bees or other local hives during nyc honey week. also, check out kim rubin’s 2nd place finish in theparisreview's photo contest. the bee’s knees. 

(thanks/via: momofuku)


The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 

Goes with this from NPR.
(thanks/via: smithsonian)

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction.

The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report

Goes with this from NPR.

(thanks/via: smithsonian)


Tuning out distractions doesn’t mean checking out; in fact, what you’re piping through your headphones may actually help you concentrate.  Read More>

(thanks/via: fastcompany)

Tuning out distractions doesn’t mean checking out; in fact, what you’re piping through your headphones may actually help you concentrate.  Read More>

(thanks/via: fastcompany)

This video captures some of the stunningly beautiful personality of nature and geology!

The life of a mountain is not that different from our own. It has a beginning, a middle, and an end. They are born of collisions and violent explosions, jagged edges mark their adolescence, they crack and tear when icy cold seeps within, and in time, they are smoothed and weathered, faces wrinkled by footpaths and rivers, one day sinking back into the Earth which launched them forth.

Watch millions of years of geologic life go by in mere minutes in this gorgeous new video, The Weight of Mountains from Studiocanoe.

(thanks/via: jtotheizzoe)

Cool stuff from smartereveryday!!!!

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.
As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  
What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.
I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

(thanks/via: smartereveryday)

Cool stuff from smartereveryday!!!!

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.

As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  

What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.

I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

(thanks/via: smartereveryday)

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

Space Facts - Interesting Facts about Outer Space

(thanks/via: Chris Jones’ really amazing Space Facts website)

Trailer for The Theory of Everything, the spectacular new film about Stephen Hawking and his wife, Jane. Complement with Hawking’s actual theory of everything, animated in 150 [!!!!] seconds. Also see Errol Morris’s excellent documentary about the iconic physicist. 

EXCELLENT!!

(thanks!!/via: explore-blog)

This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.
(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.

(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

Watch this trailer for Alive Inside.  More about the documentary here and the FastCo Create post iPod Connected Seniors Recharge Their Memories

Don’t forget those grapefruit headphone with new music when it’s time okay?

(thanks/via: FastCoCreate)