This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.
(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

This is somewhat related to Walnut And Carrara’s earlier post about music and the aging mind.  Could it be that reading stimulates young brains the way music stimulates elder’s brains?  

The facts illustrated on this WHY READING AT A YOUNG AGES MATTERS graphic, paints only a small picture of what books can do for your little one.

Download a printable version of this inforgraphic HERE.

(thanks/via: harpercollinschildrens)

Watch this trailer for Alive Inside.  More about the documentary here and the FastCo Create post iPod Connected Seniors Recharge Their Memories

Don’t forget those grapefruit headphone with new music when it’s time okay?

(thanks/via: FastCoCreate)


In 1983, excavations for a new terminal at the Charleston International Airport in Charleston, South Carolina, began with a bang, as metal hit bone. The construction workers had stumbled upon a fossil so big that it required a backhoe to unearth. Now, over thirty years later, the remains have been identified as that of the largest known bird ever to have flown our skies.
The creature lived 25 to 28 million years ago and had a wingspan of 20 to 24 feet—twice that of the largest volant (i.e., flying) bird alive today, the wandering albatross.
Like the albatross, this ancient enormous bird soared long-range over the ocean, but how it managed to do so with a mass and wingspan that seemingly defies aerodynamic theory had, until recently, been a mystery. “Anyone with a beating heart would have been struck with awe,” says paleontologist Dr. Daniel Ksepka, whose study of the bird’s flight performance was published July 7, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"This bird would have just blotted out the sun as it swooped overhead. Up close, it may have called to mind a dragon."
Discovery of the Biggest Bird That Ever Flew Rewrites Our Planet’s Histories and Mysteries

(thanks/via: newsweek)

In 1983, excavations for a new terminal at the Charleston International Airport in Charleston, South Carolina, began with a bang, as metal hit bone. The construction workers had stumbled upon a fossil so big that it required a backhoe to unearth. Now, over thirty years later, the remains have been identified as that of the largest known bird ever to have flown our skies.

The creature lived 25 to 28 million years ago and had a wingspan of 20 to 24 feet—twice that of the largest volant (i.e., flying) bird alive today, the wandering albatross.

Like the albatross, this ancient enormous bird soared long-range over the ocean, but how it managed to do so with a mass and wingspan that seemingly defies aerodynamic theory had, until recently, been a mystery. “Anyone with a beating heart would have been struck with awe,” says paleontologist Dr. Daniel Ksepka, whose study of the bird’s flight performance was published July 7, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This bird would have just blotted out the sun as it swooped overhead. Up close, it may have called to mind a dragon."

Discovery of the Biggest Bird That Ever Flew Rewrites Our Planet’s Histories and Mysteries

(thanks/via: newsweek)

This very rare all-white humpback seriously looks like a ghost. Watch this hauntingly beautiful animal here. 

AWEsome!!!!!!!!

(thanks/via: huffingtonpost)



This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings
… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here. 
And watch our video!:


(thanks/via: NPR, jtotheizzoe, skunkbear

This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings

… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here

And watch our video!:

(thanks/via: NPRjtotheizzoeskunkbear

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).

These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).

Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.

(thanks/via: skunkbear and ted)

(via npr)

This is so cool and useful.

Ultra-cool. Ultra-Ever Dry is a superhydrophobic (water) and oleophobic (hydrocarbons) coating that will completely repel almost any liquid.

A droplet resting on a solid surface and surrounded by a gas forms a characteristic contact angle θ. If the solid surface is rough, and the liquid is in intimate contact with the solid asperities, the droplet is in the Wenzel state. If the liquid rests on the tops of the asperities, it is in the Cassie-Baxter state.

(thanks/via: scienceisbeauty)

Climate change isn’t a distant threat — it’s happening right now.

Here’s what President Obama is doing to cut carbon pollution and prepare the U.S. for the impact of climate change.

(thanks/via: whitehouse)

photos by uda dennie of eusocial ants in batam island, indonesia. (more ants and other insects posts

(thanks/via: awkwardsituationist)

Why is ketchup so hard to pour? - George Zaidan (by TED-Ed)

(thanks/via: TED-Ed and The Salt-NPR

Glass Organs Sigga Heimis/GlassLab

Images by The Corning Museum of Glass

(thanks/via: archatlas)

(via washingtonpost)


When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine — an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more.
From the TED-Ed Lesson How sugar affects the brain - Nicole Avena
Animation by STK Films

(thanks/via: teded)

When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine — an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How sugar affects the brain - Nicole Avena

Animation by STK Films

(thanks/via: teded)

Slow Life (by Daniel Stoupin)

Incredible Slo-Mo Video Of The Underwater Creatures You Never See

Coral is actually a living creature, but the human eye rarely catches it moving. This incredibly slow-motion video lets you see the ocean life you don’t notice, before it’s destroyed by climate change.

This is an amazing deep dive into the psychedelic world of fluorescent coral from marine biologist and photographer Daniel Stoupin.

Coral are not dead skeletons or rocky statues. They are living structures that move, swell, and slurp daily, just not on time scales that we can recognize with our eyes. Thankfully, Stoupin and his timelapse morphs our perception of time so we can.

This work of ocean art leaves one question unanswered. Why would a coral be fluorescent in the first place? They have no ability to “see”, at least as far as we know. What evolutionary gift could glowing give?

Luckily, this isn’t the first time that Daniel Stoupin has landed on IOTBS, and we might be able to shed some (wavelength filtered) light on that question.Check out this previous gallery of his fluorescent photography to discover the fishy reason why these coral might glow.

But then there’s the sad fact that coral is currently dying pretty rapidly  because of global warming…

(thanks/via: jtotheizzoe and fastcompany)